Vaughan’s Vocabulary

Don Vaughan provides infrequently used words to strengthen your
vocabulary.

Beverly Bremers, an actress, singer and teacher graciously gave me a phone interview. She told me the interesting story about how she got roles in the Broadway musical “Hair. Her father, who was her manager, was wary of the title at first, but on the subway they talked to a couple who were raving about a performance of “Hair” that they had attended that night. Bremers auditioned and joined the cast. After playing Chrissy she left “Hair” and performed in “The Me Nobody Knows.” She returned to “Hair” as Sheila and was in its last performance on Broadway.

Bremers had the pop hits “Don’t Say You Don’t Remember” and “We’re Free.” She teaches her Voicercise method (the idea came from “Mousercise” that she wrote for Disney). Voicercise is based on one’s voice being the instrument through which the heart and mind communicate.

Now, let’s get to this week’s quiz. No. 1 was suggested by my newest reader, Beverly Bremers!

1. authenticity (awe-thin-TIS-uh-tee)

A. genuineness

B. the quality of being authentic

C. trustworthiness

D. verity

E. All of the above

“It’s not especially advanced,” she said, “but I feel it’s an important word nonetheless, in work and in life.” E is the answer.

2. Which is not one of three traditionally named magi?

A. Melchior

B. Caspar

C. Enobarbus

D. Balthazar

Bremers has recently composed “Gift of the Magi: The Musical,” an adaption of a short story by the same title by O. Henry. Enobarbus is a character in Shakespeare’s “Antony and Cleopatra.”

3. Which word is in “Don’t Say You Don’t Remember”?

A. desks

B. table

C. car

D. handwriting

In the insert for “Super Hits of the ’70s,” Paul Grein writes, “The key to the song is the bridge, which teeters between resignation (“people never stay the same forever”), disillusionment (“somebody always loves a little more”) and hope (“together we’ll find a way to make tomorrow worth living for’).” Grein added, “One hopes that Beverly has found Mr. Right. And that in any event she has stopped writing on the corner of tables. Jeez, Bev.” No. 3 is B.

4. Which three words describe “Hair”?

A. avant-garde

B. conservative

C. Kafkaesque

D. stentorian

E. rarefied

Avant-garde, stentorian and rarefied apply to Hair.

Last week’s mystery word is madcap.

This week’s mystery word to solve comes after the third gerund in “Hair.” It and the word that follows it rhyme.

Don R. Vaughan, Ph.D., of Eupora is a speech and theater professor at East Mississippi Community College, Golden Triangle. Contact him at dvaughan@eastms.edu.